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Best Blondies Ever (with Brown Butter, Bourbon & Butterscotch)

No longer the boring cousin of the brownie, these blondies are packed with tons of flavor from brown butter, toasted hazelnuts, chocolate chunks, butterscotch chips and a healthy splash of bourbon.

Pomegranate Glazed Slow-Roasted Salmon with Fennel & Leeks

Just because a recipe uses fruit, it doesn’t have to be fruity. A pomegranate glaze gives slow-baked salmon a delightful balance of sweetness and acidity, and we serve it over a bed of roasted lemons, leeks and fennel.

Mustard and Maple-Glazed Butternut Squash stuffed with Farro and Winter Greens

Opposites attract in most walks of life, and recipes are no exception. Our favorite dishes are flavored with a careful balance of sweetness and spice. We’ve infused a mix of winter vegetables and farro with sweet maple syrup and spice supplied by Maille Dijon Originale mustard, to make a really delicious and easy vegetarian dinner for a cold evening.

Best Blondies Ever (with Brown Butter, Bourbon & Butterscotch)

No longer the boring cousin of the brownie, these blondies are packed with tons of flavor from brown butter, toasted hazelnuts, chocolate chunks, butterscotch chips and a healthy splash of bourbon.

Pomegranate Glazed Slow-Roasted Salmon with Fennel & Leeks

Just because a recipe uses fruit, it doesn’t have to be fruity. A pomegranate glaze gives slow-baked salmon a delightful balance of sweetness and acidity, and we serve it over a bed of roasted lemons, leeks and fennel.

Mustard and Maple-Glazed Butternut Squash stuffed with Farro and Winter Greens

Opposites attract in most walks of life, and recipes are no exception. Our favorite dishes are flavored with a careful balance of sweetness and spice. We’ve infused a mix of winter vegetables and farro with sweet maple syrup and spice supplied by Maille Dijon Originale mustard, to make a really delicious and easy vegetarian dinner for a cold evening.

Pollo a la Brasa (Peruvian-style Roasted Chicken)

Pollo a la Brasa (Peruvian-style Roasted Chicken)

Pollo a la Brasa (Peruvian Chicken)

Our version of Pollo a la Brasa (a classic Peruvian chicken dish) makes a fantastic weeknight dinner. We marinate chicken thighs in garlic, soy sauce, lime juice and spices, then roast them until the skin turns golden and crisp. Serve it with an irresistible tart green sauce, made with chilis and cilantro. 

Growing up in New York City, you learn a few very useful things. One, never get into the empty carriage of an otherwise packed train. Two, don’t even try to find a yellow cab between 4:30 and 5:30pm. And three, the very best food is usually the cheapest. For example, back in the day, you could get a roast pork bun from Hop Shing for less than $1. A big bowl of curried vegetables with roti from Punjabi Grocery & Deli went for a whopping $4. And at Pio Pio, a quarter of a golden-skinned Pollo a la Brasa, with aji verde sauce and a few maduro (sweet fried plantains), was about $7 (I’m sure it’s more now, but probably not much).

But the one bad thing about living in a cute Hudson Valley town is there are no funky little Peruvian chicken joints nearby (although we hope soon to get over to Machu Picchu, a Peruvian restaurant over the river in Newburgh). So when we get a craving for these flavors, the only thing left to do is make our own version.

Tofu and Charred Broccoli Bowls with Kimchi–Miso Dressing

Tofu and Charred Broccoli Bowls with Kimchi–Miso Dressing

Charred Broccoli and Tofu Bowl

Our version of a Buddha Bowl showcases two main ingredients — charred broccoli and spicy baked tofu. For crunch we add shredded carrots and red cabbage, then we top it off with the creamiest vegan kimchi–miso dressing. Add rice or your favorite grain and dinner is done! 

We’ve never claimed to be on the cutting edge of any particular food trends. In fact, the trendier something is, the more we tend to side-eye it, like a goth kid at a unicorn-themed prom. But you know what? Sometimes dishes we love just happen to also be eminently hashtaggable, as is the case with this bowl of charred broccoli and spicy baked tofu – topped with a vegan miso-kimchi dressing so luscious, we want to drizzle it on just about everything we make from this day forward. So go ahead and call this a Buddha Bowl, a Grain Bowl or a Rice Bowl; it doesn’t matter when dinner is this delicious. 

Charred Broccoli and Tofu Bowl

Creamy Mushroom Soup with Black Rice

Creamy Mushroom Soup with Black Rice

Mushroom Soup with Black Rice

Delectable, creamy winter soup created from a blend of mushrooms, herbs, and wild rice — this is our choice for an easy and healthy vegetarian or even vegan supper that highlights the variety and richness of the fungi kingdom.  

Happy new year, friends! I feel that we need to start this post with an apology for the irregular and infrequent nature of posts over the last few months of 2018. We have been trying to post a new recipe every week, but our time has been taken up by a secret project that we’re very excited to tell you about in the spring. In the meantime, we’re going to make a resolution to try to get back up to our regular posting schedule. And like all new year resolutions, it may crash and burn, but we are keeping optimistic heads on our shoulders.

For our first entry into the year’s culinary adventures, we’re showcasing mushrooms. The cold months can prove a challenge to someone looking for fresh, local, and healthy produce, and most varieties of mushroom are available all year round. They’re gorgeous, they’re really good for you, and we’d like to show you how we make them into a warm, creamy, incredibly silky soup that is as tasty as it is beautiful. For a soup this rich, there’s remarkably little dairy involved (and even that much is optional). And the only gluten is in the breadcrumb topping, so that’s easily avoidable as well, making this an easy vegan and gluten free meal.

Ultimate English Toffee

Ultimate English Toffee

It’s Christmas, so it’s time for toffee! English toffee, that is, made the proper, scientific way, and coated with either milk chocolate and almonds, or white chocolate and pistachios. Or both! A double-whammy of sweet holiday delight.

We couldn’t let Christmas come and go without reposting this: one of our earliest posts, but one of our very favorite recipes and something we make every single year for family parties. It just may be the toffee of your (my) dreams and while I may be indulging in a tiny bit of hyperbole, once you try it, you’ll know that I might be dramatic, but I am not a liar. In the past, I proclaimed this Salted Caramel Sauce the best thing ever and I stand by that. It’s just that there’s room on the pedestal for that sauce’s cousin from across the pond, real English toffee.  

FACT: This toffee is so good, it caused this face from Loki, this one from Arya, and best of all, this one from Matt. Okay, nerd business done.

While other toffee types are available, this toffee is hard and brittle, and thin enough that you won’t need a tiny hammer to break it up.

I’ve made a lot of toffee recipes over the years and this one is by far the tastiest and the easiest. It not only has a really nice balance of sweet and salty but the addition of a very small amount of corn syrup pretty much eliminates the danger of the sugar crystallizing, which happened to me once and was a real bummer. This is caused when the sugar crystals start a chain reaction of crystallization (the process of sugar particles clinging together) which makes the mixture grainy. Once it happens there’s not much you can do about it but there are a few things that will help prevent it from starting.

Real, Homemade Egg Nog

Real, Homemade Egg Nog

Real, Homemade Egg Nog

Rich, creamy, and unapologetically boozy, this is an egg nog whose virtues are sung by poets. Probably. Once they’ve had a few. 

LTRs (long-term readers) of this site may remember this recipe from a few years back, but we’ve updated the recipe and pictures so it’s like a whole new article! (It’s mostly the same old article.) Casual droppers-by (CDBs) won’t know any better, so for you, here’s our Christmas present to you: egg nog made proper.

If you’ve never had real, homemade egg nog, I can understand why you might be wrinkling your nose and shaking your head right now. Most mass-produced versions are pretty horrible. In fact, the only store-bought version that doesn’t make me gag is from Ronnybrook Farm, which while delicious, also costs a friggin’ fortune. You’d need to take out a bank loan if you wanted enough for a party.

Surprisingly, real egg nog is actually very easy to make and it’s a shame that so few people do it. Fortunately for me, my mom makes a killer egg nog so I know how good it can be. This version is unapologetically rich and boozy in the most wonderful way. In fact, Matt and I had a little tree-trimming party the other night and just about everyone who claimed not to like egg nog ended up slurping up several cups full. Needless to say, a lot of fun was had.