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Best Blondies Ever (with Brown Butter, Bourbon & Butterscotch)

No longer the boring cousin of the brownie, these blondies are packed with tons of flavor from brown butter, toasted hazelnuts, chocolate chunks, butterscotch chips and a healthy splash of bourbon.

Pomegranate Glazed Slow-Roasted Salmon with Fennel & Leeks

Just because a recipe uses fruit, it doesn’t have to be fruity. A pomegranate glaze gives slow-baked salmon a delightful balance of sweetness and acidity, and we serve it over a bed of roasted lemons, leeks and fennel.

Mustard and Maple-Glazed Butternut Squash stuffed with Farro and Winter Greens

Opposites attract in most walks of life, and recipes are no exception. Our favorite dishes are flavored with a careful balance of sweetness and spice. We’ve infused a mix of winter vegetables and farro with sweet maple syrup and spice supplied by Maille Dijon Originale mustard, to make a really delicious and easy vegetarian dinner for a cold evening.

Best Blondies Ever (with Brown Butter, Bourbon & Butterscotch)

No longer the boring cousin of the brownie, these blondies are packed with tons of flavor from brown butter, toasted hazelnuts, chocolate chunks, butterscotch chips and a healthy splash of bourbon.

Pomegranate Glazed Slow-Roasted Salmon with Fennel & Leeks

Just because a recipe uses fruit, it doesn’t have to be fruity. A pomegranate glaze gives slow-baked salmon a delightful balance of sweetness and acidity, and we serve it over a bed of roasted lemons, leeks and fennel.

Mustard and Maple-Glazed Butternut Squash stuffed with Farro and Winter Greens

Opposites attract in most walks of life, and recipes are no exception. Our favorite dishes are flavored with a careful balance of sweetness and spice. We’ve infused a mix of winter vegetables and farro with sweet maple syrup and spice supplied by Maille Dijon Originale mustard, to make a really delicious and easy vegetarian dinner for a cold evening.

Cumin-Roasted Cauliflower with Whipped Feta

Cumin-Roasted Cauliflower with Whipped Feta

Cumin-Roasted Cauliflower with Whipped Feta

Roasted cauliflower flavored with cumin and served with a feta cream cheese dip.

Post update: I wrote a cauliflower article in fall 2016 for our local (Beacon-based) food and restaurant magazine The Valley Table. Hop over and take a look!

Before we moved to Brooklyn (so way before we headed up to Beacon), Matt and I lived in one of the most cross-cultural neighborhoods in New York City, Astoria, Queens. It was like the real-life version of one of those 90s comedies. You know, the ones where the cab driver is sitting next to a lawyer who’s sitting next to a dominatrix and they’re all eating souvlaki prepared by a Sikh cook and served by a Russian waitress. It was like that.

It’s still one of the best places in the city to find ingredients from all over the world, especially Mexico, India and Greece. If the area is known for one type of food in particular, it’s Greek. Our weekends often involved a stop at Titan Foods where we would spend most of our rent money on olives and Feta cheese. If you’re ever in the area, check it out. It’s like the Disney-land of Feta up in there, not even kidding.

In this case we’re using feta as the sauce (more of a dip, really), for some incredibly delicious cumin-dusted roasted cauliflower.

Cumin-Roasted Cauliflower with Whipped Feta

The Whipped Feta Dip is delicious with crudités or chips, or as a spread for sandwiches.

Lasagna Bolognese with Fontina Béchamel

Lasagna Bolognese with Fontina Béchamel

Lasagna Bolognese with Fontina Béchamel

With a crunchy top and a creamy center, Lasagna Bolognese is the king of baked pastas. Our version adds fontina cheese to the béchamel with adds to the earthy richness. 

Greetings, rebel scum!

Before we get into this week’s recipe, I want to make a clarification about last week’s post: the chocolate babka. You might remember that one of us (okay, it was me) declared it to be an excellent treat for either Easter or Passover, whichever was your preference. We were inundated with literally several letters pointing out that the babka is yeasted, and a traditional Passover, one might say, tends to skew towards the unleavened. The Hebrews fleeing Egypt weren’t, after all, told “Take what you have and scarper, there’s no time to let your bread rise, oh, unless you’re making babka or something, that would be awesome, oh, good work on the pyramids btw”. So, my apologies for that slip, and please tell Uncle Mort it won’t happen again.

Lasagna Bolognese with Fontina Béchamel

This week’s dish is so much recipe – very so much recipe, wow – we actually had to enlist the help of a third Nerd, our most excellent and game friend Heather, who stayed with us this weekend and whose initial idea it was to make lasagna. Now, I made lasagna at uni – I think we all did – and it’s the easiest thing imaginable, you buy your jar of Ragu and a good cheap packet of dried lasagna, bit of cheese of some kind, Double Gloucester probably, cheddar will do at a pinch, bit of milk, nutmeg, there you have it, one lasagna, lovely.

(That sound you hear is Emily retching and then fainting).

Unbelievably Delicious Chocolate Babka

Unbelievably Delicious Chocolate Babka

Unbelievably Delicious Chocolate Babka

Chocolate babka: a sweet bread treat made with enriched dough and layered with chocolate – a weekend project you’ll be glad you made.

Greetings, Easter (and Passover***) bunnies!

***This babka is leavened and therefore not suitable for Passover, if your family, unlike ours, cares about such things. Read Matt’s full, sincere and amusing apology at the bottom of the post.

It may have slipped out in the course of this blog that one of us is Jewish, and the other of us is English. These are not, frankly, genres that strike awe into the hearts of home chefs (although Nigella Lawson does pretty well for herself) . When our best friends in town got married, they catered the reception with dishes from Italy (his family heritage), and soul food from New Orleans (hers). It was awesome. A Jewish-British catered wedding? Maybe not so much.

An Easter/(not)Passover*** dessert option, though? Now you’re talking.

Unbelievably Delicious Chocolate Babka

This Babka is filled with rich, dark chocolate with just a hint of cinnamon.

Chicken, Leeks and Spinach in a Creamy Wine Sauce

Chicken, Leeks and Spinach in a Creamy Wine Sauce

Chicken, Leeks and Spinach in a Creamy Wine Sauce

Tender boneless chicken, spinach, mushrooms and leeks cooked in a creamy wine sauce. This looks and tastes fancy, but it’s a quick and easy weeknight dinner. 

In our ongoing quest to resurrect interest in under-appreciated vegetables, I present this week’s subject: the leek.

We don’t get too excited about leeks in the U.S. but we should. They’re healthy, easy to grow*, cheap to buy, and best of all, really tasty.

Chicken, Leeks and Spinach in a Creamy Wine Sauce

Leeks, mushrooms, garlic, spinach, cream and white wine.

* Theoretically, and according to rumors I read on the internet. Matt and I, conversely, have zero luck growing leeks. Nada. Zilch. They sprout beautifully but then … nothing. They turn spindly and never really get very big. They end up more like thick scallions. It’s quite rude of them if you think about it, because here I am telling the world (our 5 readers, anyway, hello there *waves*) how great leeks are and they can’t even be bothered to make an effort in the garden. Oh well. It’s broccoli rabe this year, I’m telling you.

Steamed Mussels With Wheat Beer and Basil

Steamed Mussels With Wheat Beer and Basil

Steamed Mussels With Wheat Beer and Basil (and Garlicky Aïoli Toasts)

There are very few foods that deliver as much bang for your buck as fresh steamed mussels. They are crazy cheap and when cooked well, one of the most delicious proteins that can be plucked from the sea.

They have a mild, sweet flavor that can win over even the fish-ambivalent. Seriously, if you’re kind of on the fence about seafood, or are intimidated about cooking it, mussels are your friend. I mean, not your literal friend, that would be weird. And sad because you’re going to steam them in a delicious buttery broth which would be awkward if you’ve named them. (Sorry, Algernon.)

Fresh Mussels

Fresh Blue Mussels (the black ones commonly found in the U.S.)