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Best Blondies Ever (with Brown Butter, Bourbon & Butterscotch)

No longer the boring cousin of the brownie, these blondies are packed with tons of flavor from brown butter, toasted hazelnuts, chocolate chunks, butterscotch chips and a healthy splash of bourbon.

Pomegranate Glazed Slow-Roasted Salmon with Fennel & Leeks

Just because a recipe uses fruit, it doesn’t have to be fruity. A pomegranate glaze gives slow-baked salmon a delightful balance of sweetness and acidity, and we serve it over a bed of roasted lemons, leeks and fennel.

Mustard and Maple-Glazed Butternut Squash stuffed with Farro and Winter Greens

Opposites attract in most walks of life, and recipes are no exception. Our favorite dishes are flavored with a careful balance of sweetness and spice. We’ve infused a mix of winter vegetables and farro with sweet maple syrup and spice supplied by Maille Dijon Originale mustard, to make a really delicious and easy vegetarian dinner for a cold evening.

Best Blondies Ever (with Brown Butter, Bourbon & Butterscotch)

No longer the boring cousin of the brownie, these blondies are packed with tons of flavor from brown butter, toasted hazelnuts, chocolate chunks, butterscotch chips and a healthy splash of bourbon.

Pomegranate Glazed Slow-Roasted Salmon with Fennel & Leeks

Just because a recipe uses fruit, it doesn’t have to be fruity. A pomegranate glaze gives slow-baked salmon a delightful balance of sweetness and acidity, and we serve it over a bed of roasted lemons, leeks and fennel.

Mustard and Maple-Glazed Butternut Squash stuffed with Farro and Winter Greens

Opposites attract in most walks of life, and recipes are no exception. Our favorite dishes are flavored with a careful balance of sweetness and spice. We’ve infused a mix of winter vegetables and farro with sweet maple syrup and spice supplied by Maille Dijon Originale mustard, to make a really delicious and easy vegetarian dinner for a cold evening.

Tomato, Red Onion and Basil Sandwich

This is how I like my tomato sandwich. Fresh and tasty.

This is how I like my tomato sandwich. Fresh and tasty.

I think I might be a tomato snob. I mean, I’m not one of those people who goes to a farmers market and knows the name of every heirloom variety in existence (overheard at the Cold Spring market “They only have Brandywine and Green Zebras left, God I hate this place“).

During most of the year, I’ll pick them out of sandwiches and salads and usually try to sneak them onto Matt’s plate even though he doesn’t love them either (I feel better knowing they’ve gone to a good home). I just really don’t like the taste and texture of out of season tomatoes and would rather wait until the good ones come out. Well, they’re out, and I can finally have the tomato sandwich I’ve been dreaming of all year.

Quick aside; in my real job as a film editor, I recently worked on a movie about farm labor and learned that all commercial tomatoes (the grocery store kind) are picked green because they need to be rock hard to survive the long trip to the store. When they get near the store, they gas them (!) which turns the skins red, but the insides stay un-ripe. That’s why even pretty looking supermarket tomatoes usually taste like wet sneaker. Yum!

Anyway, I dedicate this recipe to my old roommate Paola who introduced me to the glory of the perfect tomato sandwich. When in season, we ate them for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Hers was simply good bread, ripe tomato and sliced onion but I’m a bougie bastard and can’t resist gilding the lily with mayo, basil, maldon salt and occasionally avocado. Your tomato sandwich may well be different, but wouldn’t life be boring if everyone was the same?

Zucchini Cake with Lemon Curd Filling

Zucchini Cake with Lemon Curd Filling

Zucchini Cake with Lemon Curd Filling

Zucchini Cake with Lemon Curd Filling

Ok, one more zucchini recipe. I’m not obsessed, I swear, we just have a lot of zucchini growing in the garden. Matt’s sister Hayli made this zucchini cake (AKA courgette cake) for us when we visited her in France (I know you’re feeling SO sorry for us right now) and it was fantastic. Very summery from the lemon curd and the zucchini keeps the cake extremely moist. I adapted it from Nigella Lawson’s How to be a Domestic Goddess. We usually make it with green zucchini which gives the cake delightful green flecks throughout, but we’re growing yellow zucchini so that’s what I’ve used.

Zucchini blossoms with frizzled capers and green garlic

Fresh zucchini blossoms, about to become fried zucchini blossoms

Fresh zucchini blossoms, about to become fried zucchini blossoms

A not-so-fringe benefit to growing squash is having access to the loveliest edible of the summer. Squash blossoms! So dang perty. They are usually stuffed with ricotta cheese and fried in batter which is (of course) delicious but we didn’t have a lot of them and didn’t want to do a whole fried bonanza so we just sautéed them in a bit of olive oil until they were wilty and brown and then frizzled some capers and garlic to go over them. It took about 5 minutes and ended up being really tasty. The fried zucchini blossoms become silky and translucent, almost like stained glass. Of course, they wilt down to nothing so don’t plan on this being dinner but if you grow squash, fried zucchini blossoms is a pretty good way to use the flowers without a lot of fuss.

We used the last of our green garlic (young, hard neck garlic from the farmers market) which is milder than regular grocery-store garlic. Either would work though so don’t sweat it.

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Zucchini Fritters with Lemon Basil Sour Cream

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I think zucchini get a bad rap. At our local farmers market, the corn and tomatoes are total attention whores and poor little zucchini are waiting in the background for someone to notice that they’re sweet too. If only they’d take their glasses off and let their hair down… Well the good tomatoes aren’t ready yet and a girl can’t live on corn alone, so zucchini, you’re coming home with me.

I had bought several before remembering that, when you grow something, you don’t really have to buy it anymore. So I realized I needed to find a recipe that uses quite a bit of it. The pale squash below are from our garden, and the darker ones are from the market. (If you’re growing your own, or even just picking from the market, it’s best to go for zucchini that are smaller. They tend to have less water and a firmer texture.)

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Cold Cucumber Cocktails, perfect for summer.

Cucumber cocktails

Cucumber cocktails for your delectation and delight.

Arya’s favorite food (other than dirty napkins stolen out of the garbage) is cucumbers. She goes bonkers for them. I mean she’ll eat pretty much anything that is, was or came near food, but she loves cucumbers. While I’m kind of horrified to think I may be culinarily influenced by my dog, lately I’ve really starting getting into them too.

Obviously they’re great just to munch on and in salad, but I also really like them in cocktails. If I’m really in the mood to…ahem… drink, I’ll have a Hendricks Cucumber Martini, but that mo-fo is strong. When a light, refreshing drink (with a lot less alcohol) is more my speed, I’ll (ask Matt to) make a Grapefruit, Cucumber Gin Fizz.

The same recipe also works well with Blood Orange Soda (like San Pellegrino Aranciata Rossa). If gin’s not your thing, use vodka instead. Of course you could always leave the spirits out all together. Whether it’s cucumber cocktails or cucumber mocktails, we’re fine with it, but just don’t leave out the cucumber.